Causes Of Swimmer’s Ear

Swimmer’s ear is an infection of the outer ear structures. It typically occurs in swimmers, but since the cause of the infection is water trapped in the ear canal, bathing or showering may also cause this common infection. When water is trapped in the ear canal, bacteria that normally inhabit the skin and ear canal multiply, causing infection and irritation of the ear canal. If the infection progresses it may involve the outer ear.

Symptoms Of Swimmer’s Ear

The most common symptoms of swimmer’s ear are mild to moderate pain that is aggravated by tugging on the auricle and an itchy ear. Other symptoms may include any of the following:

  • Sensation that the ear is blocked or full
  • Drainage
  • Fever
  • Decreased hearing
  • Intense pain that may radiate to the neck, face, or side of the head

Treatment Of Swimmer’s Ear

Treatment for the early stages of swimmer’s ear includes careful cleaning of the ear canal and eardrops that inhibit bacterial growth. Mild acid solutions such as boric or acetic acid are effective for early infections.

For more severe infections, if you do not have a perforated eardrum, ear cleaning may be helped by antibiotics. If the ear canal is swollen shut, a sponge or wick may be placed in the ear canal so that the antibiotic drops will be effective. Pain medication may also be prescribed.

Follow-up appointments with your physician are very important to monitor the progress of the infection, to repeat ear cleaning, and to replace the ear wick as needed. Your otolaryngologist has specialized equipment and expertise to effectively clean the ear canal and treat swimmer’s ear.

What Patients Are Saying

I have been dealing with extremely weird problems with my right ear for about two and a half months. After being ignored at my regular physicians office, I decided to see Dr. Schwartz ( Swartz) and I am so happy I did. The hearing test was thorough and I received the results immediately after which gave me relief. The assistant was so nice and made me feel like she was truly listening to me. I loved how she relayed everything to the doctor before he came in. Because of this, He gave me answers and set up a game plan immediately. I have never felt so taken care of! I truly felt important and heard. Thank you everyone in the office for being so amazing!

I recently had to find a new ENT after my employer changed my insurance. I have a complicated health history so it can be daunting to find a new provider that you trust. I was very pleased with Dr. Picerno – she was kind, patient and very thorough! I’m so happy to have found her! I also met with Amelia, an audiologist, and she was also awesome!

Dr Monica really listened and provided procedures / medicines that resolved sinus and throat problems I had been dealing with for a long time.

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Prevention Of Swimmer’s Ear

A dry ear is unlikely to become infected, so it is important to keep the ears free of moisture after swimming or bathing. Removable earplugs, sometimes worn for hearing protection, can be used to keep moisture out of the ear canal. Q-tips should not be used for this purpose, because they may pack material deeper into the ear canal, remove protective earwax, and irritate the thin skin of the ear canal creating the perfect environment for infection.

If you do not have a perforated eardrum, rubbing alcohol or a 50:50 mixture of alcohol and vinegar can be used as eardrops to evaporate excess water and keep your ears dry.

Before using any drops in the ear, it is important to verify that you do not have a perforated eardrum. Check with your otolaryngologist if you have ever had a perforated, punctured, or injured eardrum, or if you have had ear surgery.

People with itchy ears, flaky, or scaly ears, or extensive earwax are more likely to develop swimmer’s ear. If so, it may be helpful to have your ears cleaned periodically by an otolaryngologist.

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Sources:

  1. www.entnet.org
  2. www.cdc.gov
  3. www.healthychildren.org

 

Allison Rasband, M.D.
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Dr. Allison Rasband received her medical degree from Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska and is board-certified with the American Board of Otolaryngology. She performed her residency at the University of Kansas Medical Center. She specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric ear, nose, and throat problems, with a special interest in pediatrics and the surgical treatment of nasal and sinus problems. She loves spending time with her husband, four kids, and yellow lab and enjoys skiing, hiking, and mountain biking.

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